Reply To: Labs/IVs/Line accessing workflow

  • Mindy Bibart

    Member
    February 16, 2022 at 7:40 am

    Our process is very similar. 
    We obtain peripheral labs if a patient is being seen in clinic and doesn’t need an infusion and we are relatively sure will not need a transfusion.
    We will access their central line if a patient is scheduled for either, or is likely to require transfusion. 
    Additionally, we will obtain labs from a tunneled catheter or PICC and then hep-lock it as their daily heplock.

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    Mindy Bibart, DNP RN CPHON NE-BC CSSBB
    Director of Patient Care Services, Hematology/Oncology/Blood and Marrow Transplant
    Nationwide Children’s Hospital
    Columbus, OH
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    Original Message:
    Sent: 02-15-2022 09:38 PM
    From: Kristina McAnally
    Subject: Labs/IVs/Line accessing workflow

    Yes! They come to our Provider side first (where they can get accessed if need be). If they are only there for counts/potential blood products, a veni is done first. If counts are good and no products needed – no port access. If products needed THEN they get accessed and go to our Infusion side. If they’re a peripheral IV then we start the IV, draw the labs, and they’re ready to go if products are needed. Hope this helps! If they are there for potential chemo then we go ahead and access their ports for blood draw so they’re ready if their counts are good for chemo.

    Kris McAnally, RN, BA, BSN
    Inova Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Center
    Fairfax, VA

    Original Message:
    Sent: 2/15/2022 9:14:00 PM
    From: Christina McGrisken
    Subject: Labs/IVs/Line accessing workflow

    For those working in outpatient infusion centers, what is your workflow surrounding lab draws for patients who will be receiving infusions that same day? Do you peripherally draw labs prior to port access/IV placement? Do you have a designated area for patients who need labs but will have them drawn with line access/IV placement?

    Thank you!

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    Christina McGrisken, FNP-BC
    Sickle Cell Nurse Practitioner
    The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore
    Bronx, New York
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